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tv   Victoria Derbyshire  BBC News  March 23, 2017 9:00am-11:01am GMT

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hello, it's thursday, it's 9 o'clock, i'm victoria derbyshire, welcome to the programme. we're live in westminster this morning where an attack by a man thought to be inspired by islamic state brought chaos and terror to the heart of london. the man killed three people and left 29 others needing before being shot dead outside the houses of parliament. anti—terror police have not released the attacker‘s name, but confirm they've made seven arrests in raids around the uk. hundreds of detectives have been working through the night, and during that time i can confirm we have searched six addresses and made seven arrests. the enquiries in birmingham, london and other parts of the country are continuing. the officer who died has been named as pc keith palmer, who was 48 and a husband and dad.
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foreign office minister tobias ellwood is hailed a hero after trying to save pc palmer. two of the officer's colleagues are amongst the seriously injured being treated at hospitals across london. the prime minister is expected to address the house of commons later. last night she described the attack as "sick and depraved" we will all move forward together, never giving in to terror and never allowing the voices of hate and evil to drive us apart. and the government's emergency committee will meet to discuss its response to the attack. outside parliament it is business as usual as mps and staff return to work ina usual as mps and staff return to work in a calculated act of defiance with tributes later in the house of commons for those murdered in yesterday's slaughter. good morning. as you can see and
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hear, we are live at westminster this morning, the day after a man brought terror and chaos to the heart of the capital city. after brussels, after paris and istanbul, after berlin, it was inevitable, say some, this would happen again in london. we are about 100 metres from the palace of westminster. this is the palace of westminster. this is the house of lords end and beyond that the house of commons and over to my left, westminster bridge, where hundreds of tourists, londoners, people from around the world were going about their daily business as they cross that bridge and a man drove onto the pavement
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and a man drove onto the pavement and moved down dozens of people, killing some and critically injuring others. police have made theirfirst arrests in connection with the attack. raids were carried out in birmingham overnight — and seven people were arrested. the metropolitan police a four people died in the incident including the attacker. a man and woman died when the attacker drove a car at pedestrians on westminster bridge. pc keith palmer was stabbed to death as he tried to stop the attacker entering the palace of westminster. the suspect was then shot dead by plain—clothes police officers. 29 people are being treated in hospital — seven of them are in critical condition. a minute's silence will be held across westminster and whitehall at 9.30. sarah corker has this report. the moment of the attack on westminster bridge. on the right—hand side we see a car moving
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at speed along the pavement in front ofa at speed along the pavement in front of a slow—moving line of traffic. a figure, we now know it is a woman, falls into the water. and then panic as members of the public realise something is wrong. three shots rang out. a photograph shows the immediate aftermath. an armed police officer stands poised over the attacker. at the foot is a knife and another knife is found on the ground. the police officer stabbed to death was keith palmer, a8, a husband and father. he was a member of the parliamentary and diplomatic police command. the major terror investigation is under way in the capital and west midlands. overnight there was a raid on a flat in east birmingham, the area closed off for more than two hours. the car used in the attack is believed to be hired
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in solihull. hundreds of detectives have worked through the night and we have worked through the night and we have searched six addresses and made seven arrests. the inquiries in birmingham, london and other parts of the country continue. it is our belief that this attacker acted alone and was inspired by international terrorism. two people died on the bridge. at least 29 others were wounded, seven are in critical condition. the prime minister said parliament would meet as normal today. she urged the people of london and its visitors to do the same. and we will move forward together. never giving in to terror. and never allowing the voices of hate and evil to drive us apart. police have not named the attacker, but they believe they know his identity. they are treating it asa his identity. they are treating it as a case of islamist—related
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terrorism. my message to those who wa nt to terrorism. my message to those who want to harm us and destroy our way of life is you will not succeed, you will not divide us, we will not be cowed by terrorists. overnight a show of solidarity from the french capital, a city that has also suffered from the scourge of terrorism. the lights of the eiffel tower was switched off. the prime minister called the incident sick and depraved, but the official terror alert level has not been raised. the priority for the police 110w raised. the priority for the police now will be to find out if the attacker was working alone. good morning. what is the feeling in westminster this morning, nicky morgan? clearly there is disruption. people are having to get into the houses of parliament by a different
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route. i think a sense of shock and a sense of, did this really happening? and yes it did. but also a determination we will get on with life which is why the commons will sit this morning. people going around their normal daily lives. in terms of the house of commons sitting as usual. at 9:30am there will be a minute's silence and then an opportunity for you and your collea g u es an opportunity for you and your colleagues to pay tribute to those who lost their lives, but the significance of those going about their business as normal, what is that? it is business as usual. if the terrorists win, we start affecting our daily lives when we allow the terror they attempt to create to stop us going about our usual business. it is significant that after the minute's silence we will continue to discuss the business we were going to discuss which is international trade questions. the first hour of every day we have question to administer
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and we will continue with that and thena and we will continue with that and then a statement from the prime minister. it is deeply significant the message you send is of course a moment of sombre reflection about heroism, the police officer who died, the tragedy of people innocently murdered, but also that we go on. the terrorist struck at the heart of westminster, but, many of those who lost their lives were on westminster bridge, tourists, people going about their daily business. they were innocent victims. that is what makes this particularly awful. we are guarded at westminster by fantastic policemen and security personnel and one of them lay down his life yesterday and ran towards the danger as others did. this seems on westminster bridge of innocent people and many will watch the programme, who will have walked over the bridge and visited london, live
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in london, come from overseas, and the thought that they can suddenly be struck down in such a terrible way i think will weigh heavily on all of us. i would like to say london is still open, we would like people to come and visit. the palace of westminster is a world heritage site and it is important it remains open. i want to ask about your colleague who tried to help save the life of the police officer. tobias ellwood. that is a picture used by many newspapers today. he is an extraordinary man. his family has faced personal tragedy. extraordinary man. his family has faced personaltragedy. he lost a brother in the balie bombings. faced personaltragedy. he lost a brother in the balie bombingslj faced personaltragedy. he lost a brother in the balie bombings. i was in bangladesh when we had an earthquake and there he was telling everybody where to go, how to be safe. it is typical of the man he would run to that event and try to
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help, based i think on his army background. you say it is important people get the message london is open as usual. i have spoken to people on their way to work, college, university, this morning, and a numbersaid, college, university, this morning, and a number said, yes, college, university, this morning, and a numbersaid, yes, iam college, university, this morning, and a number said, yes, i am scared, iam and a number said, yes, i am scared, i am anxious. my heart goes out to the people who lost loved ones yesterday but you have to go on with your life. precisely. there is reason to be cautious and to be vigilant, but, what the terrorists want, the moment they win is the moment we cease to be a civilised society, the moment we cease to operate as business as usual. one of the most telling things about yesterday, after the police shot the terrorist, they attempted to save his life. that is what we do in civilised, western society. we do not try to operate in the same way
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the murderers do, we show a different example. people can hear the sirens and see the activity behind us 150 metres away from the palace of westminster, does it feel different to you this morning? of course. we have a huge media scrum here, things are different. we live under the shadow of what happened yesterday. but we will simultaneously be vigilant and defiant and we will carry on doing our best. unfortunately, the forces of darkness may continue to do their worst. what about security at the palace of westminster? is it inevitable it will be reviewed? it is always kept under review and i am sure they will book, in time, at what happened, and what was breached. as somebody pointed out, it did hold because the attacker
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only got 20 metres inside and then was stopped by police and tackled. there may be other areas, ways that people responded to this that will be needed to be looked at. it is important that parliament, it is a place of work, notjust mps there, there are thousands of members of staff, journalists, members of the public come for beatings. we have school tours, and it is important it continues —— members of the public come in for meetings. things are taken off come in for meetings. things are ta ken off people come in for meetings. things are taken off people when they can come m, taken off people when they can come in, if there is a sense of danger, which can be inconvenient, like an airport, but that balance has two continue. you do not want it to be a fortress ? continue. you do not want it to be a fortress? not at all. it worked. the tragic circumstances as a result of that, but the security stood up.
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this attack happened almost exactly at the time we had a vote and you had 600 members of parliament travelling across the parliamentary estate at that moment. we may need to consider the gates are constantly opening because you have ministerial ca rs opening because you have ministerial cars arriving. those gates were not locked because of the frequent use? the majority of the day the gates are locked. you have to beep your horn to get access. the time of the vote they opened and shut because you have ministerial cars arriving will stop whether that was a factor lam not will stop whether that was a factor i am not certain but all those things will be reviewed. the balance will continue. for viewers watching on bbc two, coverage continues now on bbc two, coverage continues now on bbc two, coverage continues now on bbc one. we can say good morning to viewers
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on bbc one. we are live from westminster. both have been talking about their desire that the palace of westminster does not become a fortress after what happened yesterday. we will talk to phil mackie who is in birmingham, where police have carried out raids overnight we are told. we are expecting a minute's silence, and then an opportunity for you and your collea g u es then an opportunity for you and your colleagues to pay tribute to those who try to help yesterday, and to those who lost their lives. to offer support to our police and
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security services in the continuing investigations. this will be a long—running investigation. this is only the start of it. thanks for your time. we will go live to birmingham and our correspondent. tell us the latest from there. i have just seen three plain clothes and one uniformed police officers go through the brown door, the door to the flats above this iranian restau ra nt, the flats above this iranian restaurant, where armed officers came at around 11 o'clock last night. people in the other flats say they saw them here, certainly until they saw them here, certainly until the early hours, when three people we re the early hours, when three people were taken away. we also know that during the night officers were seen taking out boxes of what we presume is evidence in this investigation. there are several police vans parked
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up there are several police vans parked up here and one presumes inside they are still carrying out forensically investigations. there you can see the prime minister leaving downing street. making her way to the house of commons where the assistant political editor norman smith is. what is the atmosphere like this
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morning. it is quieter than usual. life is continuing as normal. people are determined to carry on as usual. ordinary staff at westminster waiting to get back with their work. starting with questions to liam fox. at10:30am we starting with questions to liam fox. at 10:30am we will get the statement by the prime minister when she will lead tributes to those killed yesterday. that will be a sombre moment. democracy faces a challenge from
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those who reject its values. the desire to almost send a visible symbol of democracy that is not going to be cowed, that will not speak tailed and is carrying on as usual. we will have the speaker's procession going through shortly, and there will be the chaplin, sergeant at arms. they have done that route week in, week out, it has been the same for sentries and will continue today. members of the public will come here to ask to see theirmp and raise public will come here to ask to see their mp and raise issues with them. they will still be able to queue up to go to the public gallery and hear debates. the only thing they will
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not be able to do is go on the tours. that is a crime scene. that is the only thing curtailed. apart from that, democracy continues as usual as it has done for centuries. we will be back with you at 9:30am, just ahead of that minute silence. the police have just named just ahead of that minute silence. the police havejust named one just ahead of that minute silence. the police have just named one of the victims of the attack yesterday. according to a member of staff at the college she went to she was a highly in fact it is her principal, the head of dld college london, one of the victims named in the last few minutes. this is bbc news, we are live from westminster. also with us,
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leader bridge, your reflections, having experience what you extends 12 years ago? it has taken me right back. i was in the tube that got bombed, and when the news broke yesterday and the photo started appearing on the net, i was at my office and i said i can't see this. it was just like rewinding office and i said i can't see this. it wasjust like rewinding back office and i said i can't see this. it was just like rewinding back in time, and seeing those bodies and injured people, ijust started thinking about what happened on the piccadilly tube when the bomb went off. but what did stand out, and what really hit me was how london came together yesterday. we u nfortu nately lost a came together yesterday. we unfortunately lost a police officer yesterday who tragically was killed.
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for me, 12 years ago, what stood out was that one voice saying it is the police, we are coming to get you. it was a male police officer. when the bomb went off, it felt like there was a noose around my heart and it was a noose around my heart and it was being tightened, but when i heard that voice, it is police, we are coming to get you, i felt the most reassurance and my life. to lose a police officer, those who make london and the uk say for us, has released truck me and everyone. it is unfortunate we have lost his life and others with him as well, but it has been 12 years on, we have faced another attack, we can't let this divide us in any way. in fact, let's be the london that we are. we stand together. we will not be defeated, because if we are we are feeding right into the hands of those who want to divide us. which is an echo of what the prime minister theresa may said. lee.
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average, a former national security adviser. this attack hired a axa and could have got a knife from anywhere. that is almost impossible to protect people against, isn't it? it is very difficult. last year, al baghdad ebert out a call to all their supporters from isas, and they used the term household terrorism, to use but ever resources you have, knives, axes, hammers, your vehicles, they didn't have to look at complicated attacks like expose of all requiring firearms. a very low technical approach to an attack. in theireyes, a low technical approach to an attack. in their eyes, a successful outcome to yesterday, tragic from our perspective. could have been a lot worse. but very difficult for us to identify that activity, the main thing we can do as we saw fa nta stically thing we can do as we saw fantastically well was the police response and the emergency services,
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the medics and members of the public. it was a very cohesive response to that tragic event yesterday. which the accu -- acting they prepared, they knew what they would do. they train on a regular basis around the country, notjust at iconic sites. they are training and rehearsing all the time for these sorts of incidents. is this also train. yesterday we saw the dynamic lockdown kick in at westminster. this is where normal businesses should be doing this on a regular basis, just in case, and it isa rare regular basis, just in case, and it is a rare incident that you will be involved, but so they can protect you and members of the public. we will talk to you much more in the next half an hour or so. you can probably hear the police helicopters across and also the media helicopters above. the road ahead of
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me is jam—packed because this main thoroughfare through westminster is obviously shutdown. we are just in front of a police called in because thatis front of a police called in because that is where a major investigation is going on. on the other side of the palace of westminster is annita mcveigh. iamjust i am just outside. the forces chaplain, the reverend jonathan osborne in the service of the force. we are told that craig mackey will make some brief statement. we heard from the acting deputy head of the met police. the latest figures i now have are
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currently only four dead, and 29 we re currently only four dead, and 29 were treated in hospital. we are also still collating numbers of walking wounded. sadly seven of those in hospital are still in critical condition. tragically, the deaths included pc keith palmer who was protecting parliament, two members of the public, a woman in her mid—a0s and a man in his mid—50s. the fourth man of course was the terrorist who was shot dead by armed police at the scene. hundreds of detectives have been working through the night, and during that time i can confirm we have searched six addresses and made seven arrests. the enquiries in birmingham, london and other parts of the country are continuing. it is still our belief, which continues to be borne out by our investigation, that this attack at acted alone and was inspired by international terrorism. to be explicit at this stage we have no specific
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information about further threats to the public. the investigation is ongoing and developing all the time, and we continue to focus on his motivation, his preparation and his associates. the latest from the police at new scotland yard. it is coming up to 930 on this thursday morning, we are live from westminster. it is a cold, bright morning here in the capital. in the heart of the city, the morning after the terrorist attack on the seat of government, the seat of parliament, four people were killed, including the attacker, the man who took his car onto the pavement of westminster bridge and mowed down dozens and dozens bridge and mowed down dozens and d oze ns of bridge and mowed down dozens and dozens of pedestrians before making his way into the palace of westminster, into the the environs, the railings behind the gates, where he stabbed a police officer, pc keith palmer. and after that he was shot by armed police. in a moment or
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two we will go live to the commons, where we are expecting a minute's silence, and then we are expecting politicians to mark what happened yesterday, and to pay tribute to those who lost their lives. former national counter terrorist adviser lee dodderidge is with me. what would you want to hear from your elected representatives this morning? i would like them to send out a message, we are london, we are united. i survived 7—712 years ago and we did not let that the foetus. i will post you there because mps are filing in to the chamber, the house of commons, as you can see. a sombre mood, clearly. and in the next moment or two, they will pause
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for 60 seconds to remember the three people killed by the attacker yesterday. norman, what is the feeling amongst politicians right now? obviously shock, anger too, but the two other emotions i think our, one, that sense of defiance, determination that parliament is not going to be disrupted, it will carry on as usual. it always does whenever it is under attack. and of course it isa it is under attack. and of course it is a moment for reflection, and really for people to be given an opportunity because we will have that statement from the prime minister in about an hour's time, for mps to be able to reflect on the courage of the police officer who died, but also the bravery of other officers, and the work they do, date m, officers, and the work they do, date in, day out, giving this place safe, and to reflect too the sense of horror at the terrible, pointless
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slaughter of innocent people, many tourists, just enjoying london on a beautiful spring day, crossing westminster bridge, taking in the iconic views. and just how precious and fragile democracy is, that there are those who reject the values of democracy, and the fact come as the prime minister said yesterday that westminster was targeted, it underlines the fact that westminster, the way it is seen around the world because it was the first sort of modern parliament, and it is seen as emblematic of aspirations around freedom, freedom of expression, tolerance, all those sort of values, which may be we take for granted, but which events like yesterday bring home just help precious those values are and how they have to be defended. i expect when the prime minister delivers her tribute, much of it will be similar
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to watch said last night but i also suspect she will urge people to be vigilant. although we have 30,000 police officers in the capital, they cannot be everywhere guarding eve ryo ne cannot be everywhere guarding everyone at all times. much of the responsibility for safeguarding the city falls on individual citizens to be alert, to be aware, to respond to concerns, and i suspect that too will form part of the message that she gives to mps when we hear from her in about one hour's time. before then, we should have very soon a minute's silence in parliament, but also along whitehall too, to give people, people who can't come in here, a chance tojust people, people who can't come in here, a chance to just reflect on what happened yesterday, to pause, to ta ke what happened yesterday, to pause, to take stock, i think we may well hear the division that bell signed
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here before the minute's silence just to alert mps and staff were ever they are —— the division bell. many will still be in their offices, to give them an opportunity to let them know that the minute's silence is taking place. and of course in the police enquiry, that continues, going ahead not just the police enquiry, that continues, going ahead notjust here in london but there have been investigations in birmingham, where that was that raid. still no firm details about the attacker. the police not confirming his nationality, but again suggesting they believe he was acting on his own. silence
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we gather tojoin in prayer is for those who mourn keith and victims of yesterday's incident. we give thanks for keith, who, as we honour his memory, we put our trust in the future. loving god, we remember all people of faith and no faith. we ask you to protect and guard all those who are called to serve at the metropolitan police service and other emergency services. grant them the spirit of wisdom and discernment. make them strong, upright and compassionate for the welfare of all who they serve. silence
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order, order. questions to the secretary of state for international trade, mr bob blackman. question number one, mr speaker. mr speaker, as we begin... as we begin our questions today it is appropriate we recommit ourselves to the values this parliament represents. those who carry out such wicked and depraved actions. we must ensure it is not violence, hatred or division, but decency, forgiveness and tolerance that prevails in our country. a minute's silence at scotland yard
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and also along whitehall and here in parliament in central lobby, where officers and mps, staff, stood, heads bowed, the business coming to a standstill. marked by the division bell, to say the silence will begin and a division bell at the end markets ending. i think we can cross now to scotland yard. as part of my leadership role, i will be going to cobra later this morning for the next meeting for an update in relation to the various elements of this investigation and response. you will be aware that i personally was a witness to yesterday's events. pa rt a witness to yesterday's events. part of yesterday's events,
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including part of the tragic attack on pc palmer. as with all police officers, i have a duty to secure my evidence and give statements yesterday evening, which i did before resuming our role, leading the response to this incident. i know i will have the opportunity later to take questions but thank you for being with us this morning and thank you for that act of remembrance. craig mackey from the scotland yard, from the metropolitan police with the latest on the investigation. after what happened yesterday. i will introduce you now to three londoners, olivia, neil and
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will introduce you now to three londoners, olivia, neiland ali. what is your feeling? travelling around london it is a sombre mood. people have lost their lives and families affected. there is also a feeling of resilience and determination in the air. i think londoners are fairly, i suppose resilient to these sorts of things and life has to go one and we have to get on with life. just walking around london, people are going about their business, which is fantastic to see. i really noticed this morning a level of nervousness but people determined to go about their daily life and that is crucial. my concern is what are the repercussions of this, where do people take this story and start the investigations and peoples views, particularly at a time when the
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country feels divided and what will happen in terms of people'sconversations and perceptions of others in the community, which is concerning, but in terms of daily life it is about getting on with it. to not allow it to take us away from what we do in our daily life. good morning. what is your attitude today? as the guests summarised, nervousness. there was definitely a sense of people getting on with things but my thoughts are also of course with what happened yesterday with the people of the bridge and the potential backlash that other londoners might experience, especially in the muslim community, the more visible members of the community. but life goes on. who's responsibility do you think it is to draw people together? primarily the
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politicians, the mayor of london. he has done a good job so far. the most important thing they need to do is show unity and leadership and bring everyone together and i think they are doing that so far.|j everyone together and i think they are doing that so far. i have spoken to lots of people, schoolchildren, students, people going to work, and you talk about nervousness. some said, iam you talk about nervousness. some said, i am scared, but i have to go to work. inevitably there is a nervousness, your senses are heightened that somehow we have to move through that. there is a fear. last night when i heard the news and i was last night when i heard the news and iwas in last night when i heard the news and i was in central london, there was fearfor my i was in central london, there was fear for my family and friends. how will i get home? who do i know in that area? but that was a quick thought process and now it was, i have to get home. as londoners, we have to get home. as londoners, we have become sadly prepared for
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things like this. we are very aware of our surroundings and people around us. it has been hammered over the past 12 years. keeping an eye out for things, be vigilant, and londoners are prepared. of course people might be nervous. i place faith in the emergency services and intelligence services and i'm sure they are doing the best they can. as people who come into the city we have a responsibility to keep an eye out for things and people will continue to do that. it is a collective responsibility, you are right about politicians and leaders but as individuals we have a collective responsibility to watch out for each other but not be concerned about reporting things we are concerned about. how can you be so aware of people driving badly down a bridge? it is a car, not the traditional terrorism we have been
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euston the pass. although sadly they are getting used to in other european cities. we saw it lastjuly in nice. at the christmas markets. in germany. it is something you cannot predict or forecasts. there is so much you can do. it is a random act. talking about responsibility and politicians. i am a teacher and a big part of what we do as teachers is trying to create a culture of a acceptance, awareness, diversity, multiculturalaspects, and that is important. i'm sure children this morning have woken up whose families work in london are scared. i spoke to boys between 13
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and 15, on their phones, obviously, and 15, on their phones, obviously, andi and 15, on their phones, obviously, and i said, what is your attitude this morning? they said, we are a bit scared and our mums and dads have said be aware. but they are walking to school as they do every day. it is a testimony to londoners that all the terror attacks we have experience through the ira days, onwards, people go about their daily lives. there is a remarkable level of resilience. we spoke about londoners and that is testament to them and it is the best thing anybody can do, having the fear and sense of proportion and continuing with daily life. and for those tragically affected. they will not be feeling resilient today. fear was one of those things but last night, watching the news, i was close to
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tea rs watching the news, i was close to tears listening to stories about the policeman, who is a father. and all the others. we have heard one of the women killed yesterday is a member of staff at a college in london and the principal said she was a loved colleague. absolutely. and the devastation. they will need support at some point. they have family and friends, but as a society we have a responsibility to reach out to people when they have been through such tragic circumstances. did the prime minister get it right when she talked about in a defiant way, the will have said, that this evil will not so divisions in our society? it was a very powerful speech, but to claim it won't divide us, it is a big claim. i think there
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isa us, it is a big claim. i think there is a level of division that we have to face in this country anyway, and it is easy to make those statements, but what you practically do? it is one thing to say that outside downing street but what are the practical actions, how downing street but what are the practicalactions, how are downing street but what are the practical actions, how are we bridging those divisions and gaps between different communities and individuals? but aside from the practical realities besides this challenge, as a symbol of the leader of the united kingdom she was absolutely right and she had to make that statement as the symbol of britain. of course. she was right to say that but it is to a certain extent rhetoric and it is translating that into actionable outcomes. no one should underestimate how difficult that task is. thank you very much. i appreciate your time. we are live at westminster and the terror attack
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here yesterday began at around 20 to three yesterday afternoon with a car travelling at high speed north across the bridge towards parliament. this is how the story unfolded, and a warning that you mightfind unfolded, and a warning that you might find some scenes upsetting. this appalling incident began when a single attacker drove his vehicle into pedestrians walking across westminster bridge. we have details of a potentially serious incident coming from various news agencies of two people shot outside the westminster parliament. the building is apparently in lockdown. you like, get undercover now! police are currently evacuating the street outside parliament, amidst reports someone has been shot. there is blood everywhere. people
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have been shot or stabbed all over the place. i am now going to suspend the place. i am now going to suspend the sitting of the house, this house is now suspended but please wait here. we heard what we thought were gunshots, turned around and we saw the car had ploughed into a lady, i think it was a lady, i'm not 100% sure, but underneath the wheel, and you could hear screams. on the other side of the red there was a body and when i looked further up there was another body. when i looked over the side of the bridge there appeared to bea side of the bridge there appeared to be a body in the water as well. bodies of military must have been about ten or 12 bodies in different places along the bridge. it seems a police officer has been stabbed.
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this man had something in his hand, it looked like a stick of some sort. we could see the man in black moving his arm in a way that suggested he was either starving or striking the yellow jacketed was either starving or striking the yellowjacketed policeman. was either starving or striking the yellow jacketed policeman. we do not yet know the full impact of this terrible incident, but i know that the whole country will be thinking and praying for those who are affected, as i am. we have declared this as a terrorist incident, and the counterterrorism command are carrying out a full—scale investigation into the events today. sadly i can confirm that now four people have died. one of those who died today was a police officer, pc keith palmer, a member of our parliamentary and diplomatic protection command. aged a8, keith had 15 years service and was a husband and father. let me make it clear today, as i have had cause to do before, any attempt to defeat those values through violence and
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terror is doomed to failure. we will all move forward together. never giving in to terror, and never allowing the voices of hate and evil to drive us apart. theresa may v prime minister maliki last night, this morning at westminster is it is a cruel, blow each morning, you can hear the sounds of the police helicopters above us. we are at the house of lords end of westminster, this is normally a very busy thoroughfare, com pletely normally a very busy thoroughfare, completely closed off as you would expect. let me introduce you to ben wallace, the security minister, and kevin scocco from politics home, who saw the events unfold yesterday within the parameters of westminster. ben wallace, as security minister, how safe is
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london? london is safe, we have some of the best security services of the world, some of the best police. they have cancelled leave, there is more police on the streets, reassurance patrols, and we are following up any leads we have found from this attack. we are determined to make sure that london goes back to work. parliament is taking part of that lead, we are back in business, and i think what londoners who have been here before over many decades and i'm afraid we'll probably be here again at some stage, that we are getting on with business. we should reassure the public that we really have some of the best people well invested over the decades to make sure we have the tools they need to follow u p sure we have the tools they need to follow up and see off any other danger. the police say they believe at this stage that this man was acting alone, that he was inspired, they say, by international islamist ideology, but he was acting alone. yes, that is the evident point at the moment, that it was a single
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person in that car who then carried out the attack on poor old pc keith palmer, and that is why the incident is effectively over here, but of course no one does anything without a trace, no one does things entirely on their own. if he was radicalised committee had support elsewhere, and thatis committee had support elsewhere, and that is what the police will following up. kevin, hello to you, you watched this unfold. what is it like to see this from your office window? it is a very strange experience, you can't really take it in. isaw experience, you can't really take it in. i saw that the man forced his way through a security gate, and attack the police officer. and at that point it didn't make any sense. we had heard a crashjust before it, but thought they had maybe been a smash on westminster bridge road or something like that. but i saw him come through, almost like it was in slow motion. he wrestled the police
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officer the ground and then another police officer approached he got up and produced a knife, or what looked like a knife anyway, his outstretched arm towards the second police officer. then my view was obscured and then if you seconds later i heard gunfire. that was the moment it became obvious that it was some kind of terror attack. just trying to take it on board was very strange. so you work right there in the heart of what happened, what is your attitude about that today?|j your attitude about that today?” think it is great that parliament is back. we just had a minute was like silence of mps, you send out a strong message that britain and london won't be cowed by events like yesterday. we can go back to business as normal. we have seen all around people in london walking to work as if nothing happened, which is very good to see and sends out a strong message. hello ann mclauchlan, snp mp. what is your attitude this morning?”
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mclauchlan, snp mp. what is your attitude this morning? ijust feel very sad for the people who have died, and the people who have what is described as catastrophic injuries. who knows how their lives will change? injuries. who knows how their lives will change ? the injuries. who knows how their lives will change? the families of keith palmer and others who died, just utter sadness. how do you view this attack, is it about striking at democracy, harming innocent people going about their business at a bridge? it is a murderer, murdering people for no good reason. none of those people are known to the guy, i assume. they did nothing to him and i don't think we should allow anything else to get in the way of the fact that this person has murdered these people. the attacker was able to get through carriage gate, which one mp described as a wea k gate, which one mp described as a weak spot, in terms of security. it isa weak spot, in terms of security. it is a gate in frequent use, it isn't
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locked, there is a bolt that could go straight across it. that is going to have to change, isn't it?” go straight across it. that is going to have to change, isn't it? i don't think they will on the hoof look at the overall protective security of parliament but we shouldn't forget that this individual did not get into parliament. he was stopped with little -- into parliament. he was stopped with little —— lethal force, into parliament. he was stopped with little —— lethalforce, pc keith palmer made sure that he gave his life and protected me and those who work in parliament. we are a parliament of the people, we are open for the people. my constituents, trade unions, people come and see us every day and that is what we are there to do. entrances are always vulnerable in every place, that is why we have armed police there, that is why we have police on the gate. but of course all these things are reviewed. the meeting i had before this incident was with the head of security in parliament about what we can do to keep mps and their staff
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say. all of that is always under co nsta nt say. all of that is always under constant review. after this, we should give the space for the professionals to do theirjob, to make sure we pursue any other suspects or certainly make sure it is safer throughout the united kingdom, and then in the cold light of day, further on, of course these things will continue to be reviewed. but i think the best thing for now is to remember that this assailant did not get into the house of commons, did not get more than a few metres into the front gate. pc keith palmer did his duty, and more so saved many other lives by what he did, and! saved many other lives by what he did, and i think that is the key point about it. we are expecting the prime minister to make a statement to the commons and we will ring that to the commons and we will ring that to our viewers live. what are we expecting from mrs may this morning? the prime minister's speech gave last night i thought was incredibly moving but powerful. reiterating
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what british values are all about, reiterating that people who try to twist religion, or try to make an attack on our values and the people in parliament, will always fail. and that we are supported, and we are very lucky to be supported in this country by police and intelligence services who are some of the best of the world, and many governments have invested in their capability. i would just reassure your viewers, the counterterrorism strategy is about not just the counterterrorism strategy is about notjust catching people, it is about preventing people being radicalised, and about delivering all over the united kingdom, radicalised, and about delivering all overthe united kingdom, in scotland, lancashire, where i represent, and in the capital and in the very iconic buildings we see here. it is about making sure people understand that the best thing we can do is to go back to work and be confident that they have underneath them the net of some of the most professional people in the world in this area of counterterrorism. thank you very much, ben wallace, devon schofield and ann mclauchlan, snp mp. as you heard mr wallace say, the
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best thing that people can do is go back to work. we will bring you the very latest news at ten o'clock this morning live from westminster. as you can hear, police helicopters overhead, and the media helicopters overhead, and the media helicopters overhead going about their business. one of the women who died in the attack has been named as aysha frade, who worked at a sixth form couege frade, who worked at a sixth form college close to westminster bridge. the principle of dld college said ays ha the principle of dld college said aysha frade was highly regarded and loved and would be deeply missed. we can get the latest from new scotland ya rd can get the latest from new scotland yard where annita mcveigh is this morning. yes, the police are the public and the public the pliskova those were the public the pliskova those were the words a few minutes ago of craig mackey, acting commissioner of the metropolitan and, as he stood alongside colleagues in front of the
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eternalflame, alongside colleagues in front of the eternal flame, the flame that commemorates those who have lost their lives in the service of the metropolitan police, and of course uppermost in their thoughts, the loss of their colleague, pc keith palmer, yesterday in the westminster attack. of course 2a hours a day, every day of the year, the men and women of the met collect —— protect people in london. that protection continues today amidst the huge investigation of yesterday's attack and the loss of their colleague, one of their own, and the loss of their colleague, one of theirown, in and the loss of their colleague, one of their own, in the line of duty. craig mackey, acting commissioner, went on to say that investigation continues. it is also about reassurance for the public and hi—vis ability of officers on the streets, many more officers on duty. he said although the police practice for all sorts of scenarios in response to different possible terrorist attacks, nothing he said, could prepare them as officers or
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the public for the reality of yesterday's attack and of course the loss of one of their own. that is the latest from new scotland yard. it's 10 o'clock. we can hear the chimes of big ben live from westminster where an attack by a man thought to be inspired by so—called islamic state brought chaos and terror to the heart of london yesterday. the man killed three people and left 29 others needing hospital treatment before being shot dead outside the houses of parliament. anti—terror police have not released the attacker‘s name, but confirm they've made seven arrests in raids around the uk. hundreds of detectives have been working through the night, and during that time i can confirm we have searched six addresses and made seven arrests.
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the enquiries in birmingham, london and other parts of the country are continuing. in the past hour, the second victim is named as mother aysha frade. she was reportedly on her way to pick up her children from school. pc keith palmer, a father, has been named as the police officer who was killed. mps held a minute's silence to remember the victims. the government's emergency cobra committee will meet later. the prime minister has left downing street and will address the house of commons in around half an hour. last night, she described the attack as "sick and depraved." we will all move forward together, never giving in to terror. and never allowing the voices of hate and evil to drive us apart. inside parliament, staff, mps and
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peers return to work as normal in a calculated act of defiance, with tributes to be lead shortly by the prime ministerfor those tributes to be lead shortly by the prime minister for those murdered tributes to be lead shortly by the prime ministerfor those murdered in yesterday's slaughter. police have made theirfirst police have made their first arrests in connection with the attack in westminster in which four people we re westminster in which four people were killed, including the attacker. raids were carried out in birmingham. seven people have been arrested. in the past half an hour, silences and prayers were held in parliament and at new scotland yard to reflect
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on yesterday's events. two people died when the attacker drove a car at pedestrians on westminster bridge. one of the victims has been named this morning as aysha frade. she's been described by her college principal as "highly regarded and loved". pc keith palmer was stabbed to death as he tried to stop the attacker entering the palace of westminster. the suspect was then shot dead by plain—clothes police officers. 29 people are being treated in hospital, seven of them are in critical condition. sarah corker has this report. the moment of the attack on westminster bridge. on the right—hand side we see a car moving at speed along the pavement in front of a slow—moving line of traffic. a figure, we now know it is a woman, falls into the water. and then panic as members of the public realise something is wrong.
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three shots ring out. a photograph shows the immediate aftermath. an armed police officer stands poised over the attacker. under his foot is a knife and another knife is found on the ground. the police officer stabbed to death was keith palmer, a8, a husband and father. he was a member of the parliamentary and diplomatic police command. a major terror investigation is under way in the capital and west midlands. overnight there was a raid on a flat in east birmingham, the area closed off for more than two hours. hundreds of detectives have worked through the night and we have searched six addresses and made seven arrests. the inquiries in birmingham, london and other parts of the country continue. it is our belief that this attacker acted alone and was inspired by international terrorism.
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two people died on the bridge. they included mother of two aysha frade, a spanish teacher who worked ata frade, a spanish teacher who worked at a college a few hundred metres away. at least 29 others were wounded, seven are in critical condition. the prime minister said parliament would meet as normal today. she urged the people of london and its visitors to do the same. and we will all move forward together. never giving in to terror. and never allowing the voices of hate and evil to drive us apart. police have not named the attacker, but they believe they know his identity. they are treating it as a case of islamist—related terrorism. my message to those who want to harm us and destroy our way of life is you will not succeed, you will not divide us, we will not be cowed by terrorists. overnight a show of solidarity from the french capital,
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paris, a city that has also suffered from the scourge of terrorism. the lights of the eiffel tower were switched off. the prime minister called the incident sick and depraved, but the official terror alert level has not been raised. the priority for the police now will be to find out if the attacker was working alone. you can hear sirens going off and thatis you can hear sirens going off and that is the sound that will accompany london life for the rest of today and the next few days possibly. it is really busy. the road behind me that leads to the palace of westminster obviously that is cordoned off and completely empty and it is normally a main thoroughfare. a high the camera, the roads are jam—packed, because
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commuters, tourists and the like are trying to find their way around london roads because so many in the heart of the city are shut. we will now speak to a former counterterrorism detective who was pa rt counterterrorism detective who was part of the 7/7 investigation. also chris carley, and a doctor from the counter extremism group quilliam. i wa nt to counter extremism group quilliam. i want to talk about pc keith palmer. a a8—year—old officer with over a decade of service, a husband and dad, an unarmed officer who tried to stop the attacker. how do you pay tribute? he paid the ultimate sacrifice. we should be thankful there are people like him who stand
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in the way of a man who wanted to hurt many people. it is a tragic event and the ultimate sacrifice that hopefully all police officers hope they will never have too pay but he did his duty and it is a great tragedy. what is the priority for officers in terms of the investigation? the biggest thing to find out is to identify the man who drove the car on the bridge, where the car came from. they believe they know who he is and they believe he was acting alone. the next thing is to find out where he lives and searches home and gain as much intelligence from thereabout who he has been in contact with. he is dead, there will be no criminal prosecution of him, the police will look at his wider circle and who he has been associating with and see if they can find evidence against those. do you question how the attacker could have got into palace
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yard? this is like a pedestrianised area and a car park for members of parliament. surrounded by metal fencing, but it appears he got through an unlocked gate, manned by two unarmed officers and unlocked because it is in frequent use, i am told. it is one of these bizarre things that happens. the individual has moved rapidly and people would have been focused on what was going on on the bridge and suddenly you have an individual moving at speed through a gate that is open. it happens. hard and fast and quickly, thatis happens. hard and fast and quickly, that is how these events occur.” can bring in the doctorfrom counter extremism group quilliam. how does somebody become radicalised ? extremism group quilliam. how does somebody become radicalised? the co re somebody become radicalised? the core message that terrorist groups promote worldwide is that muslims
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are separate and muslims need their own state and to live under their own state and to live under their own law and oh no allegiance for a garden —— raiola no allegiance to for example of british governor —— payola no allegiance. that is a basic message used to promote this kind of radicalisation. the message from al-qaeda and is in recent months has been to use vehicles to cause carnage? we saw that in nice and berlin and we must ta ke that in nice and berlin and we must take that threat seriously. when they say it they mean it, to use ca rs they say it they mean it, to use cars and trucks as murderous weapons. it is important to come together. we are united as citizens of britain and society is built on trust, including that vehicles do
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not become weapons of murder. society is based on mutual trust and we must work harder on our sense of shared values and what brings us together as a society and nation.“ people use vehicles as lethal weapons, how do you protect the public? it is almost impossible. people walking across the bridge, tourists, people going about their business and suddenly a car drives down the pavement. trying to stop it and mitigate against it is almost impossible. westminster bridge is unusual. we have a lot of street furniture. lamp posts, rubbish bins, benches. westminster bridge is unusual, there is nothing on it and if you have a long run of nothing and can get a vehicle on a pavement with hundreds of people on the pavement looking at big ben, if you
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get a vehicle up there there is a free run. it is a weakness we need to identify. in mainland europe, it is low—grade attacks with knives, blunt weapons, cars and lorries and thatis blunt weapons, cars and lorries and that is where we need to invest our money. as a former counterterrorism officer, for you, what security flaws have been exposed as a result of the attack? i would not say it has exposed any flaws. it is interesting to see where the vehicle hit the outer perimeter walls. where the hostile mitigation stops. when we look at security, it should be based on how the response will kick in after. people say the gate was open, but it is meant to be open for people to walk inside but the proof of the response was when they dealt with the attacker, albeit he was
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inside. there are no flaws. we can look back in hindsight. this morning additional measures were taken down the road behind us. it will be interesting to see where the barriers will be positioned through the day. the acting deputy commissioner said there will be more armed police on the streets. something people will have to to get used to for the short—term. something people will have to to get used to for the short-term. we need to give support to officers. there has been a lot of bad press about them walking out and buying sandwiches in tesco but these people are doing an importantjob and we need full support behind them. thanks. we can go to birmingham now. police say they have made several arrests. our correspondent is there. iam in arrests. our correspondent is there. i am in front of the flats where the arrests happened last night. the brown door leads upstairs to two
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flats a bove brown door leads upstairs to two flats above a persian restaurant. it happened around 11pm in the busy hagley road. they closed it. people in the restaurants and the shops and the pub at that time were told to stay put. they were held on lockdown until about 1am when they were let go. i have spoken to someone living in the neighbouring flat who took pictures from his window. around 11pm, two or three unmarked vehicles pulled in and armed officers got out and went in through that door. later witnesses said they saw three people ta ke witnesses said they saw three people take it away. we have not had it confirmed they were arrested but we are assuming that three people were pa rt are assuming that three people were part of the investigations to which the met police referred to today. several hours later, police officers brought out sealed boxes of evidence
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from the flat. there is still police activity this morning with several vehicles parked along the street. about an hour ago, a uniformed officer and three plainclothes officers went back into the flats and there is still clearly forensics work going on. there is another line of enquiry in the west midlands over towards solihull, where it is believed there is a link to a rental car company believed there is a link to a rental carcompany and believed there is a link to a rental car company and the car involved in the attack on westminster bridge yesterday. we do not have any of the names of people taken out of that flat. although we are in edgbaston, we are on the north side of hagley road, on the edge of ladywood will stop edgbaston one of the most expensive places to live in the city, ladywood certainly one of the poorest districts in the whole country. this is an area where you get people from different countries
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living, a transient area with people coming and going all the time. neighbours i spoke to were not necessarily sure of who lived in the flat that was the scene of investigations last night, and it continues to be so today. thank you. phil mackie reporting live from birmingham. bbc news live from westminster. yesterday an attack paralysed the heart of government, as mps and hundreds of government officials were held in lockdown for hours in the house of commons, and yet this morning the house of commons sits as normal, the usual time at 930. let me introduce you to two labour mps, barbara keeley and clive lewis, and what do you think of that, the fact it was business as usual at 9:30am today? it was very
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good. it was very moving. it sends the right message that london carries on and business carries on as usual. i would agree. it does send a clear message. clearly there isa send a clear message. clearly there is a tenseness, you can see the police helicopters and the police presence. there was quiet and empty on the trends this morning but people are going about their business. this reflects in what is happening. a mum reportedly going to pick up
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her kids from school. she's a normal woman trying to get on with her life. life.. their parents must have been really worried about them. they we re been really worried about them. they were fantastic in spirit. sipping, wavings to us. it was great to have them there. it is very important everything carries on as usual. people still visit and london is open. but i think what we have to reflect on is because of the police, they are our human shield and they protect us so we can do this work as mps that we are able to carry on. it is very touching. i really feel for these guys this morning who've lost one of their own and everybody in the westminster village feels that. it is very important we pay tribute, the most important people today are the most important people today are the families of those victims. pc keith palmer and his family. important messages have come from people like brendan brendan cox who lost jo last
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people like brendan brendan cox who lostjo last year. they've experienced the biggest loss. you're on your way to the house of commons now. we're expecting the prime minister to give a statement in about ten minutes' or so time. you'll be walking back up there into a street which is cordoned off. a street which is quiet compared to a normal thursday morning. what would you like to hearfrom normal thursday morning. what would you like to hear from the normal thursday morning. what would you like to hearfrom the prime minister this morning? she will pay respects to those who've died. we will pay our respects in a minute's silence. it is time to pause for reflection on the work the security service do to protect us every day. they run towards shots. we run away from them, if anything. every day we're in there, we speakto from them, if anything. every day we're in there, we speak to these people, talk to them, say good morning to them. i think, at the back of your mind, you always know that something like this can happen. at the back of your mind sub consciously. today, a day we half expected has occurred. i want to hear from the prime minister a
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pause. i don't want to see a knee jerk reaction. do you mean in terms of security? i think so. changing the way we live our lives? completely. i don't think we'd hear that today. it will be a reflection, on update on the security situation, the investigation on the latest we know that she can explain. i think she'll read the public mood which is one of reflection and thinking about those who've lost their lives and where we go from here in a positive and practical way. how important is to you both as politicians that the house of commons stays relatively open? clearly, there's airport—style security, concrete bollards outside. all those things you'd expect. but it's full of members of the public in there? that's right. the most important thing is we keep access. we all though that was important after we lost jo we all though that was important after we lostjo last year. we've carried on with extra security. seeing our constituents, doing our campaigning work. it is important
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parliament reflects the way wee behave in our constituencies. we did have that cordon of police. amazing emergency services people. people ran overfrom emergency services people. people ran over from st thomas' hospital. we have remarkable capacity to cope. westminster are a village. we'll pull together. there is a really important message in the fact we're back there this morning working. important message in the fact we're back there this morning workingm isa back there this morning workingm is a balancing act. when people from my constituency come down to visit, i say, this is your place. it is a people's palace. we work here but you own it. that mustn't change. we've already seen changing over the years from very little security. we now see bollards, gates, armed police which are there permanently now. we've seen chose changing. if there needs for a few changes, that's acceptable. but the principle of people being able to come in as the public and enjoy what is their palace is right and proper. that
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needs to happen. thank you very much. i better let you go. two labour mps much. i better let you go. two labourmps on much. i better let you go. two labour mps on their way to the house of commons to hear theresa may before she gives her statement to the commons and tries to sum up the mood of a nation, as well as paying tribute to those who lost their lives, including a8—year—old pc keith palmer who we know was a husband, a dad, who'd served in the metropolitan police for over ten yea rs. metropolitan police for over ten years. we'll take you live to the house of commons, of course, at 10.30 as you'd expect ahead of that statement from theresa may. we can talk now to the former mayor of london, ken livingstone. who was the mayor during the 7/7 attacks. what's your attitude this morning? the important thing is londoners shouldn't czech the way we live our
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lives or turn against each other. that's what the terrorists want. more security, more surveillance, all that can go over the top. the simple fact is we stop almost every terrorist attack. only about one every three or four years gets through. we've very good sir veilance. a terrorist like this, most probably an individual acting on their own, it is very difficult to get hold of them. most of the terror attacks have been that. an individual. not someone taking direct orders from isis in afghanistan or something. we heard from mark rowley, acting deputy commissionerfor the from mark rowley, acting deputy commissioner for the metropolitan police, since the killing of lee rigby outside his barracks in may 2013, the metropolitan police counter—terrorism officers have thwart 13 terrorists attacks. potential terrorist attacks. it's
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important to keep perspective, isn't it? absolutely. it was very much like that in the immediate aftermath of the terrorist attacks in 2005. the police were still able to stop two or three attempts a year. it isn't justice lambic fundamentalists. we found extreme far right groups that were stockpiling weapons and things like that. we've been able to stop them as well. i'm going to bring in jackaway puttnam. come round here. come in. jackie is a survivor of the london bombings injuly 2005. goodness, how were you feeling yesterday? terrible. i was working not too far from here. saw it on the news. and it felt as if it was happening again. what i was thinking was what i'm sure lots of us were
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thinking, which was oh, no, not again. it surprised me because we're 11 years on. you think you're doing fine, everything's wonderful, you've got it all under control. then it ta kes got it all under control. then it takes the legs out from under you again. i know that you're on a whatsapp group with other survivors from 7/7. i'm guessing there were m essa g es from 7/7. i'm guessing there were messages going around amongst you? absolutely. everyone wanted to check where everyone was. is everyone ok. people were posting in, yes, i'm feeling like this. the warmth of it was tremendous. it made such a difference to know there were people who were... it was like, just the comfort of it. support group. it was huge. i'm hearing police are now saying they have made eight arrests. we were reporting earlier it was seven. we're told from the
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metropolitan police they have made eight arrests in connection with what happened at westminster yesterday. jackie, you're back here today. you work not far from here. you're here. that's an amazing thing? well, it's a fight i fight every day. really? some days are worse than others. most day are fine. the first battle i had to fight was get back on the underground. i needed to take control back. decisions i wanted to make about my life were my decisions to make not anyone else's. so i had to make not anyone else's. so i had to get that back. it's taken a very long time. you do it to begin with minute by minute. those minutes get longer. there is help. there is tremendous amount of help out there. cani tremendous amount of help out there. can i mention tim, harryjonathan bawl foundation for peace who specialise in — they were formed
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after the warrington bombings by colin and wendy parry. they support people who've suffered from terrorism and support the families. there is support out there for people who suffered yesterday. there is support out there for people who suffered yesterdaym terms of your psychological recovery from that day back in 2005 to now, where would you say, jackie, if you don't mind me asking, you are at? i'm functioning. there are days when obviously there's a lot of time when you don't think about it. times like yesterday, when it suddenly seems as if it wasn't ten years ago, it's still going on. it's, time telescopes for you in those moments. i have to say, when the survivors meet and get together we don't talk about it unless somebody‘s having a bad time. it's not a hug—fest have
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you see what i mean. we meet for drinks, males, go to weddings. babies have been born. it's wonderful. they're my second family. they're my extended family. it's about the future. it's not about what happened. but it's a long road. a long road to travel. there are people who suffer terribly yesterday. my heart goes out to them. the families. there is support there. post—traumatic stress cannot necessarily kick in straightaway. you may think you're fine. sometimes it can take years. but then you do get the effects and it is, there is help out there. you don't have to live with it the way soldiers used to in the past. there's help and it can be, my therapist says it can be fixed. we're competingness against
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the helicopter above us. what happened here will be reported aren't the world. the iconic big ben, the palace of westminster, westminster bridge, those images have gone around the world, of course. london is safe. that is the message that has to be got out there? it axe luteally is. my parents went through the second world war. the nazis were bombing london, killing hundreds of people every night. it didn't break our will. we went on to defeat them. no amount of attacks here can change the way we are or, in the end, defeat us. what are you expecting to hear? what do you want to hear from the prime minister when she makes her statement in the commons? the most important thing is to look at the success in the aftermath of the 7 selfen bombings. not a single muslim was attacked. no police re cord muslim was attacked. no police record of a single incident. what the muslims who did that attack
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wanted, was us to attack muslims, divide us. there was no recorded incidence. no—one daubed a mosque or anything. that's the important thing. we stand together. people who come to our country come because of our values, freedom and democracy. not to change it. we're seeing live pictures of the house of commons now. we are expecting to hear from the prime minister, theresa may, very shortly. as soon as she begins speaking, of course, you will be able to hear what she says live. jackie, thanks for talking to us and ken livingstone, former mayor of london, the mayor of this capital city during thejuly london, the mayor of this capital city during the july the london, the mayor of this capital city during thejuly the 7th bombings in 2005. we expect the prime minister to speak in the next minute. norman smith, from what theresa may said last night, she is
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in defiant made? she is and it is striking that the commons chamber is more full than often on thursday mornings when it can be relatively quiet and that reflects the fact many mps deliberately want to be seen to be there as there being reports of mps cancelling trips away to make sure they can be their for the statement from theresa may and just to show parliament continues despite yesterday's outrage. the only difference was the minute's silence, beginning with the division bell sounding so that everyone in the palace of westminster knew it was about to take place. we went into questions to liam fox, who made opening remarks about how the attack underlined the need for mps and people who work here to reaffirm the values of democracy and then we were straight into business as usual with
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questions about trade with israel, what it will mean if we leave the eu and rely on wto terms. i think mrs may is coming into the chamber to make a statement. a police officer, pc keith palmer, was killed defending us, defending parliament, and defending parliamentary democracy. arrangements have been made for books of condolence in the library and westminster hall. our hearts go out to all those directly and indirectly touched by yesterday's events. i should like to thank all colleagues, staff of the house, and members' staff for their forbearance in stressful circumstances yesterday. naturally,
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the parliamentary security authorities have taken measures to ensure parliament is safe in the light of the attack. in due time, the commission that i chair will consider together with our lord's counterparts what sort of review of lessons learned would be appropriate. however, let the security personnel who protect us, police security officers and doorkeepers, be in no doubt whatsoever as to our profound appreciation of the way in which they discharged their duties yesterday. matched by other staff of the house. that means that this morning, the house has been able to resume its business undeterred. border. statement, the prime minister. mr
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speaker, yesterday, an act of terrorism tried to silence our democracy. but today we meet as normal. as generations have done before us and as future generations will continue to do, to deliver a simple message. we are not afraid. our resolve will never waver in the face of terrorism. we meet here in the oldest of all parliaments because we know democracy and the values it entails will always prevail. those values, free speech, liberty, human rights and the rule of law are embodied here in this place. that they are shared by free people around the world. a terrorist came to the place where people of all nationalities and cultures gather to celebrate what it means to
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be free and he took out his rage indiscriminately against innocent men, women and children. this was an attack on free people everywhere. and on behalf of the british people, i would like to thank our friends and allies around the world who have made it clear they stand with us at this time. what happened on the streets of westminster yesterday sickened us all. while there is an ongoing police investigation, the house will understand there are limits to what i can say, but having been updated by police and security officials, let me set out what i can tell the house at this stage. at 2:a0pm yesterday, a single attacker drove his vehicle at speed into innocent pedestrians crossing westminster bridge, killing two people and injuring around a0 more.
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in addition to 12 britons admitted to hospital, we know the victims include three french children, two romanians, four south koreans, one german, one polish person, one irish, one chinese, one italian, one american and two greeks and we are in contact with the countries of those affected. the injured included three police officers who were returning from an event to recognise their bravery. two of those three remain ina their bravery. two of those three remain in a serious condition. the attacker then left the vehicle and approached a police officer at carriage gates, attacking the officer with a large knife before he was shot dead by an armed police officer. tragically, a8—year—old pc keith palmer was killed. pc palmer had keith palmer was killed. pc palmer ha d d evoted keith palmer was killed. pc palmer had devoted his life to the service
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of his country. he had been a member of his country. he had been a member of the parliamentary and diplomatic protection command for 15 years and a soldier in the royal artillery before that. he was a husband and father, killed doing a job he loved. he was every inch a hero. his actions will never be forgotten. i know the house willjoin me in sending our deepest condolences to his family and to the families and friends of those killed or injured in yesterday's awful attacks. i know also that house will wish to thank those who acted with such speed and professionalism to secure this place and ensure we are able to meet as we are doing today. at 7:30pm, i chaired a meeting of the emergency committee cobra and will have further briefings and meetings with
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security today. the threat level to the uk is set that severe, meaning attack is highly likely for sometime. this is the second—highest threat level. the highest level, critical, means there is specific intelligence and attack is imminent. as there is no such intelligence, the independentjoint terrorism analysis centre has decided the threat level will not change the light of the attack yesterday. the whole country will want to know who was responsible for this atrocity and the measures we are taking to strengthen security, including here in westminster. a counterterrorism investigation is already under way. hundreds of police and security officers have been working through the night to establish everything possible about the attack, including its preparation, motivation and whether there were any associates involved in its planning. while
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there remained limits on what i can say at this stage, i can confirm overnight police have searched six addresses and made eight at —— arrests in birmingham and london. it is believed still he acted alone and police have no reason to believe there are further imminent attacks on the public. his identity is known to the police and m15 and when operational considerations allow, he will be publicly identified. i can confirm he was british—born and that, some years ago, he was once investigated by m15 in relation to concerns about violent extremism. he was a peripheralfigure. the case is historic. he was not part of the current intelligence picture. there was no prior intelligence of his intent or of the plot. intensive investigations continue. as acting
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deputy commissioner confirmed last night, our working assumption is the attacker was inspired by islamist ideology. we know the threat from islamist terrorism is very real, but while the public should remain vigilant, they should not and will not be cowed by this threat. as acting deputy commissioner has made clear, we are stepping up policing to protect communities across the country and to reassure the public and asa country and to reassure the public and as a precautionary measure this will mean increasing the number of patrols in cities across the country with more police and armed police on the streets. sincejune 2013, our police, security and intelligence agencies have successfully disrupted 13 separate terrorist plots in britain. following the 2015 strategic defence and security review, we protected police budgets
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for counterterrorism and committed to increase spending on counterterrorism by 30% in real terms over the course of this parliament and over the next five yea rs we parliament and over the next five years we will invest an extra 2.5 billion in building the global security and intelligence network, employing 1900 additional staff at mi5 employing 1900 additional staff at m15 and employing 1900 additional staff at mi5 and mi6 employing 1900 additional staff at m15 and mi6 and gchq and doubling our global network of experts working with priority countries in europe, the middle east, africa and asia. in terms of security in westminster, we should be clear first of all that an attacker attempted to break into parliament and was shot dead within 20 yards of the gate. if his intention was to gain access to this building, we should be clear he did not succeed. the police heroically did theirjob. but as is routine, the police
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together with the house authorities are reviewing security of the parliamentary estate with the cabinet office, who have responsibility for the security measures in place. all of us in this house have a responsibility for the security and safety of staff and advice is available for members who need it. yesterday we saw the worst of humanity, but we will remember the best. we will remember the extraordinary efforts to save the life of pc keith palmer, including those by my right honourable friend, the memberfor those by my right honourable friend, the member for bournemouth those by my right honourable friend, the memberfor bournemouth east. and we will remember the exceptional bravery of our police, security and emergency services, who once again ran emergency services, who once again ra n towards emergency services, who once again ran towards the danger, even as they encouraged others to move the other way. on behalf of the whole country, i want to pay tribute to them for the work they have been doing to
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reassure the public, treat the injured, and bring security back to the streets of our capital city. that they have lost one of their own in the attack only makes their calmness and professionalism all the more remarkable. a lot has been said since terra struck london yesterday, much more will be said in the coming days. but the greatest response lies not in the words of politicians, but in the everyday actions of ordinary people. beyond these walls today, in scenes repeated in towns and cities across the country, millions of people are going about their days and getting on with their lives. the streets are as busy as ever, offices full and shops bustling. millions will be boarding trains and aeroplanes to travel to london and see for themselves the greatest city on earth. it is in these actions,
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millions of acts of normality, we find the best response to terrorism. a response that denies enemies their victory, that refuses to let them win. that shows we will never give in. a response driven by that same spirit that drove a husband and father to put himself between us and our attacker and to pay the ultimate price. a response that says to the men and women who propagate this hate and evil, you will not defeat us. mr speaker, let this be the message from this house and this nation today, our values will prevail. and i commend this statement to the house. order, colleagues, i statement to the house. order, colleagues, lam statement to the house. order, colleagues, i am advised we have beenjoined order, colleagues, i am advised we have been joined today by french foreign minister who is accompanied
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bya numberof foreign minister who is accompanied by a number of his colleagues and also by the deputy foreign secretary of the right honourable gentleman, sir, we appreciate your presence and you're very fitting display of solidarity with us. mrjeremy corbyn. i'd like to associate myself with the prime minister's remarks that she's just the prime minister's remarks that she'sjust made. the prime minister's remarks that she's just made. what happened yesterday within metres of where we sit now was an appalling atrocity. the police are still piecing together what took place. and what lay behind it. it behoves us all not to rush to judgment but to wait for the police to establish the facts, to stay united in our communities and not allow fear or the voices of hatred to divide or cower us. today,
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we're united by our humanity and by our democratic values. and by that human impulse of solidarity. to stand together in times of darkness and adversity. mr speaker, i expressed my condolences to the family and friends of police officer keith palmer who gave his life yesterday in defence of the public and of our democracy we thank the police and security personnel who keep us safe every day on this estate. we especially pay tribute to the bravery of those who took action to stop the perpetrator of yesterday's assault. the police and security staff lost a colleague yesterday and continue to fulfil their duties despite their shock and their duties despite their shock and their grief for their fall yep colleague which many expressed to me late last night when he was talking to them. we see the police and
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security every day. they are our colleagues, fellow workers, they are friends and neighbours. as the prime minister said, when dangerous and violent incidents take place, we all instinctively run away from them for our own safety. the police and emergency services run towards them. we are grateful for the public service yesterday, today and every day that they pull on their uniforms to protect us all. i want also, mr speaker, to express our admiration to the honourable memberfor bournemouth east whose efforts yesterday deserve special commendation. he used his skill to try and safe life. innocent people we re try and safe life. innocent people were killed yesterday walking across westminster bridge. as many millions of londoners and tourists have before them and as all of us in this chamber have. as the prime minister said, the injured include people of
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ten nationalities. we send our deepest condolences to their loved once and the loved ones of those still in a very critical condition, including the french schoolchildren so welcome in our capital visiting yesterday from corn co—in britney. we send our sympathies to them and the people in their town and community. we thank all the dedicated national health service staff working to save lives, including all those from st thomas' hospital who rushed out o'straight over to the scene of the incident to try and support and save lives. many people, mr speaker, will have been totally traumatised by yesterday's awful events. not joust totally traumatised by yesterday's awful events. notjoust all of us here but watching on television worried for the safety of their friends and loved ones. i ask in this house and the country, please, look after each other. help one another and think of one another. it
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is by demonstrating our values solidarity, community, humanity and love, that we will defeat the poison and division of hatred. the speaker: prime minister. first of all may ijoin the right honourable gentleman in expressing our gratitude to the support and solidarity the french government have shown us at this time, like other countries on the continent, france itself felt the horror and trauma of terrible terrorist attacks. we're grateful to the french government for the support they've shown us. the right honourable gentleman is right in his description of the police officers. every day when they put on that uniform, they don't know what they are going to confront in the course of their duties that day. it is a fa ct ofte n of their duties that day. it is a fact often forgotten when people see the police officer walking on the streets that actually, they do put
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their lives on the line for our safety a nd their lives on the line for our safety and security. they show enormous bravery. we are grateful to them all. we're also grateful, as them all. we're also grateful, as the right honourable gentleman said, to all those from the emergency services. to those from the hospitals who, and others, who rushed forward to give aid and support to those who had been injured at a time when they knew not what else might be happening in the vicinity and whether they might, themselves, be in danger. finally, as the right honourable gentleman says, at this time, it is so important we show that it is our values that will prevail. that the terrorists will not win. that we will go about our lives showing that unity of purpose and the values that we share as one nation going forward and ensuring that the terrorists will be defeated. the speaker: mr dominic greave. i join with my right honourable friend
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with everyone she said in respect of the deaths and injuries that have taken place. i join the deaths and injuries that have taken place. ijoin with her sending our condolences to the families and also to the injured. my right honourable friend has set exactly the right tone. those of us who are privy to the information and background of these matters know very well that it is has been little short of a miracle over the course of the last few years we have escaped so lightly from the evil thatis, escaped so lightly from the evil that is, i'm afraid, present in our society and manfests itself in these senseless and hideous acts of violence and evil. we have been very fortu nate violence and evil. we have been very fortunate in that our security services have been immensely diligent and helpful in preventing such attacks. but she may agree with me that the house is going to have to simply be resolute in accepting that such attacks cannot always be
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prevented. and that we have as a society to accept we are going to have to fight this evil with rational, democratic principles in order to get rid of it and that there are in reality no short cuts that will ever enable us to do that. the speaker: prime minister. i absolutely agree with my right honourable friend. he refers to the number of plots which have been disrupted in recent years. it is easy to forget that when the threat level is at severe, what that means is an attack is highly likely. it is not possible. we live in a free and open country, we live in a democracy. it's not possible to ensure, as he says, that we can prevent ensure, as he says, that we can p reve nt a ny ensure, as he says, that we can prevent any attack from taking place but we can work as hard as our security services and police do, precisely to try to prevent attacks from taking place. they have worked hard. they have been doing a good
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job and they continue to do a good job and they continue to do a good job in keeping us safe and will do so into the future. if we are to defeat this evil, my right honourable friend is right. we'll defeat it through our democracy and our values. we must defeat, of course, the terrible ideology which leads people to conduct these terrible attacks. may i begin by associating myself and my ron habel and right honourable colleagues with everything that has been said by the prime minister, the leader of the labour party and by you, mr speaker. today of all days, we are reminded notwithstanding our difficulties on political and constitutional issues we, we are as one in democracy, the rule of law and harmonies between people of all faiths and none. may i begin personally by wishing the home
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secretary and prime minister well as they deal on our behalf with the aftermath of the appalling indiscriminate terrorist act yesterday. our hearts go out to the family, friends and colleagues of pc keith palmer and all other casualties. we are hugely grateful to all police, security and intelligence staff and first responders who ran towards danger without western for their own safety. i include our colleague tobias ellwood. today is not a day for detailed questions. will the prime minister accept on behalf of the scottish national party and no doubt every member of this house, our huge debt of gratitude to all police and security agency staff who are working so hard to keep everyone in the country safe. does she agree with me, no terrorist outrage is representative of any faith or of any faith community and we recommit ourselves to strengthening the bonds
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of tolerance and understanding? finally s it not best to follow the advice of brendan cox, the husband of our murdered mp colleaguejo cox, who has said in the days to come, i hope we will remember the love and bravery of the victim notjust hope we will remember the love and bravery of the victim not just the hatred and cowardice of the attacker. may i thank the right honourable gentleman for his words. he absolutely correct. now is a time for us to come together to promote those values of tolerance and understanding he has referred to. to recognise that what motivates the terrorist is a warped ideology and a desire to destroy the values that we share and the values that underpins our democracy. those values of the rule of law of human rights, of tolerance and understanding and democracy itself. we should be at one in ensuring those values
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prevail. finally, as he says, we should remember the bravery of the victims and the bravery of those who keep us safe day in and day out. the speaker: mr iain duncan smith. mr speaker, may i commend my right honourable friend's powerful statement. i add honourable friend's powerful statement. iadd my honourable friend's powerful statement. i add my prayers to those of hers for those who have died and who are suffering. also, particularly, for keith palmer, our wonderful and brave police officer. we have faced such threats before. by we have faced such threats before. by those of twisted and violent ideologies and the broken stones of the arch that we enter through on a daily basis bear testament to time and again. they have failed. they will always fail because we are a beacon of freedom in this place. that is why they target us. but as they fail, may i urge my right honourable friend to ensure that as we extoll our righteous defiance in
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the face of such evil, we also lace it with compassion, tolerance and hope. well, i absolutely share the thoughts that my right honourable friend has set out. he is right, this place is a beacon of freedom. we should never forget that. we should be absolutely resolute in our determination to defeat this evil. but we should also be optimistic and hopeful for our democracy and our society in the future. the speaker: mr tim farron. thank you. can! the speaker: mr tim farron. thank you. can i thank the prime minister for her statement and early sight of it. can i also thank herfor her words from the steps of 10 downing street last knight. they were unifying and defiance. she did speak for us all. we know the police keep us safe. yesterday, in the most shocking of ways, we saw how true that really is. in my prayers are
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keith palmer, his family and all the victims of yesterday's outrage. they will continue to be there. we are beyond thankful to the police, the nhs, emergency services, actually, to the staff of this house in keeping us safe and being so utterly dedicated to their roles. those who attack us hate our freedom, our peaceful democracy, our love of country, our tolerance, openness peaceful democracy, our love of country, ourtolerance, openness and unity. as we work to unravel how this unspeakable attack happened, will she agree with me that we must not, either in our laws or by our actions curtail these values. indeed, we should have more of them. i thank the right honourable gentleman for his comments. he is right, of course, as others have said, we should ensure that our values, those values of democracy and tolerance, freedom prevail, it is those values which the terrorists
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are trying to attack. it is our very way of life that they wish to destroy. that is why it is so important out there, those millions of citizens going about their lives as they would do normally showing, in the very smallst of ways, but each of every one of them, a defiance of the terrorists. the speaker: mark field. whilst the dreadful events of yesterday took place within the boundaries of my own constituency, the palace of westminster is close to the hearts of not just the westminster is close to the hearts of notjust the 650 of us but many millions of our country men and people who live abroad. may i thank the prime ministerfor people who live abroad. may i thank the prime minister for speaking people who live abroad. may i thank the prime ministerfor speaking so eloquently for our nation on the steps of downing street yesterday and in the house today. she reminds us all the greatest tribute we collectively can pay to those so tragically murdered is to ensure we go about our business as normally as possible and maintain the values and
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liberties our forefathers have fought so hard to win on our behalf. i agree with my honourable friend. it is so important we continue to show that we, not just value but espouse in every action embody those pre—domes and liberties. those freedoms were hard fought. there are parts of this palace where there have been many arguments in the past about those very freedoms and liberties. we must ensure that they remain and that we show in our actions in our deeds and in our words that they remain at the heart of our democracy. cani can i thank the prime ministerfor her words here today and also her words on the steps of downing street yesterday. at this very difficult and important time she spoke froth all, so i thank herfor that. we are
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so proud of the bravery of pc keith
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